Sunday, September 18, 2016

Blog Decorum

 I usually post this every year. Remember this is a football blog to promote the game and the kids. I do allow some talk about the coaches and myself because we are all paid professionals.  Although we make peanuts in the grand scheme of things, it does help the integrity of the blog if we allow some criticism. Please remember what decorum means,  behavior in keeping with good taste. Thank you.


20 comments:

Anonymous said...

What bothers me about high school coaches is nepotism. This includes starters or those kids that get preferential treatment that should NOT be starting or getting the lions share of touches. This is happening at multiple schools so don't think I am calling any one coach out. Nepotism includes relatives (distant relatives too), co-workers or family friends. In small communities like those of the Huron league, it would be impossible for the coaches to live in a vacuum and not have normal relationships outside of football. That would be unhealthy. However, when it comes to football and making decisions, they should be particularly objective when it comes to their circle of friends, family and co-workers. Play the best kids. Game plan based on what's best for the team. I am personally aware of an example of each where there are "connected" parents through relatives, family friends and in one case, a coaches co-worker's kid is starting and shouldn't be. Coaches NEED to be objective or the team moral will suffer and it ruins the integrity of the program.

Chris Schultz said...

I don't think I know a coach who would do that intentionally if it meant they would have a lesser chance of winning. I know as a varsity coach of multiple sports that I also play the players that "I feel" give me the best chance to win. Are they always the most talented? No, not always. Team chemistry plays an important part in giving teams the best chance to win. Sometimes I play kids that I really don't care for, but they give me everything I ask. Remember coaches go with who "they feel" give them the best chance to win. I would argue that parents show nepotism nearly 100% of the time. Quite frankly, who would blame them. I have had at least 20 parents over the years come up and say "I think my kid should play more". I aways ask them why. The answers have ranged from; well my kid is better than so and so, to you play favorites. I have had only one parent ever come up and say "why do you play my kid?" The answer was, "he works his butt off and he gives us the best chance to win." Maybe I am naive, but maybe those coaches just think those kids give them the best chance to win or they just trust them more.

Anonymous said...

I agree Chris. The thing I don't care for is seniors playing just because they're seniors. I am for rewarding a kid for sticking it out, and giving him a chance to play his senior year. When it is obvious an underclassman is just better, you owe it to the team to make the change. I'm personally aware of our team having a few seniors playing, when there are juniors that are better.

Anonymous said...

Seniors playing sometimes comes down to understanding the system better. Juniors coming up from JV sometimes it takes time to adjust to the speed of the game at the varsity level. Now half way thru the year it could be time to make that change. Never have known a varsity coach to play someone that doesn't deserve it where it will cost the team. Parents aren't at practice and really have no idea if their child is even practicing at a level where they deserve to play. Your playing time is earned in practice. And most of the time the kid isn't going home and saying "I really practiced terrible today". In most cases a parent asks how was practice and the answer is just good. With the pressure parents put on kids today what kid do you know is going to go home and say I'm just not good enough. They don't want to dissapoint their parents. So in most cases it's how the parent handles the not playing sitituation.
You know sometimes your son is just not good enough to play ahead of the person he is behind and in today's society it's really not helping our youth handle any type of adversity. They will be in the work force some day and may interview for a job and not get it because the other person was just better.

Anonymous said...

I'm glad you said this. Chris it does happen a lot. I don't like the whole seniors get special treatment either. I know Sophmore's that are bigger, faster, stronger, and mentally stronger than seniors. It's not only in football either. Happens in a lot of sports.

Chris Schultz said...

Well, I might disagree a little bit about the seniors comment. There is an old saying in the coaching ranks that goes like this, "You win with seniors". While there may be an exception to the rule, many times that saying is true. Seniors are usually physically stronger, mentally tougher and loyal. Also, if you are trying to build a successful culture in your program, you need to be loyal to your seniors. I have seen coaches forget that sometimes and it bites them in the backside when a sibling comes through the ranks and their older sibling wasn't treated right by a staff.

Here is one thing to remember when it comes to coaching. A coach is always looking at the big picture of the program instead of just that particular year. Parents, many times, won't attend another game after their child graduates. The parents only concern is their child. When I coached basketball, I always looked at the family tree and who was related. Sometimes I kept a kid just because his upcoming brother or cousin was a 6-2 7th grader with size 15 feet. With that said, I never cut a kid who could have helped the team in that situation. It was usually an all things being equal type of thing or I just kept another kid.

Anonymous said...

If it hurts your team because you're worried someone's younger brother won't play for him, that is not fair to the team. If a coach is worried that a kid is going to be mad after he graduates because he didn't play, maybe he's not the right man for the job.

Anonymous said...

The flip side of your logic Chris; what if a talented sophomore doesn't play because of a senior privilege, he tells a younger cousin or family member that his coach doesn't play him. That kid will probably want to play somewhere where he will get a chance.

Chris Schultz said...

Read my entire post. I think your missing the point. Obviously if the kid is a stud or superstar as a sophomore then you use him to help the team. If it is a kid who thinks he should be up and starting then it is a different story. Good riddance.

I understand that rule #1 in making an argument is to acknowledge and ignore the point that is being made by someone else. I am simply showing you what I have done and what I know others do when handling that situation.

CoachTom48160 said...

11:26, that whole family sounds cancerous to me. If parents aren't keeping those kinds of thoughts in check with the older kid (or worse yet, if parents are encouraging those thoughts), coaches sometimes count on the younger kid having a bad attitude as well.

Anonymous said...

Sorry to upset you Chris. I meant to say that you are right, and you are great, we all love you Chris!

Anonymous said...

How do you know he's a stud, unless he gets a good look.

Chris Schultz said...

Like I said, most coaches look at the entire program. I'm not the hoop coach at my school anymore, but I still know every player in the program. I know which one went to camps this summer, which one's show up to open gyms, which ones that play AAU.

Anyway, I think we have beat this to death.

Chris Schultz said...

Thanks for the love. Not upset. I just will argue my point all day long. Easy to do from a neutral position.

Anonymous said...

Back in the 80's when I played there was no HUDL, highlight tapes, etc... If you played well, recruiters would hear about it through the newspaper, or word of mouth. I hate the "look at me" mentality of today's kids AND parents. Parents having their kids take supplements, some legal, some not. All in the chase of a college scholarship. Some of that mentality comes through on this blog. Good luck treating you child like a human Guinea Pig.

Anonymous said...

Nobody has mentioned this since Friday, so I guess I'll chime in. After the game Friday between Milan and Jefferson, #2 from Jefferson went up to #9 from Milan and looked as though he acknowledged 9's career. What a class act from a great player himself. Shout out to his parents for raising a classy kid. - Milan Fan

Anonymous said...

Back in the 80's there was no cable no computers blah blah 20 years from now it will be different as well people don't have newspapers delivered any more read off computer and no blogs to rip you as a player or rip coaches or spout off about you're team after during the games you didn't no scores of games til midnight or next day recruiting my friend has probably changed as well and it's hudl it's how kids get discovered enjoy the highlights of kids why not?

Anonymous said...

College recruiting is way out of control now-a-days. Fun to think about and possibly having a kid play college ball is cool. Ultimately there are very few D1 kids around and the money you get from a lower level school isn't worth paying the higher tuition to go to that school. But hey, give it hell, see what happens.
You never know. Just ask Audie Cole.

Anonymous said...

Also not to many 6'5 kids 250 lb kids that run a 4.5 in the huron league like Audie.

Anonymous said...

Audie Cole weighed 215 in high school